Pattern and purpose: a new story about the creation of the Snettisham Great torc.

The Snettisham Great torc is one of the most recognisable and well known Iron Age artefacts in Britain. Found in 1950 by Tom Rout, whilst ploughing fields on the Ken Hill estate in Snettisham, Norfolk, the torc has long been seen as the pinnacle of Iron Age goldwork found in the UK. However, it remains …

The problem of Iron Age gold sources.

(This was cropped from a previous paper as it didn't fit, but thought it was worth putting here as a blog: not peer reviewed, not definitive, but might spark some ideas....) At present, the sourcing of gold used to make Iron Age artefacts from the United Kingdom is unresolved. For Irish material, work by Warner …

Torc fragment cross-joins AKA how to make a torc jigsaw!

During the process of creating the Torc Treasury database, I kept noticing multiple fragments of the same, very distinctive, gold alloy torc coming up in Snettisham Hoard F. [Well, I think they're all from Hoard F, the problem being that although they all - bar one, but more about that later! - have a 1991 …

Looking at torcs: The B52, first steps.

When we look at torcs, the first stage of analysis usually involves photos. We have a lot of photos: my Kindle Fire currently contains about 6000 of them, cribbed from websites and online catalogues, or taken by Roll and myself. That's a lot of pics. By going through these photos on a regular basis we …

Lesser spotted torcs 1: Cushion torcs

Snettisham inevitably - being the largest collection of torcs and torc pieces ever found and with the Great torc to the fore - tends to dominate the Iron Age torc world. It should not, however, be forgotten that there are upwards of fifty other torcs represented in other parts of Britain, when incomplete examples, or …

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